With a myriad of employment, education and degree options in nursing, it is easy for a prospective nurse to get lost in the lingo. There are many paths one can take to become a practicing nurse. It is important to understand what each program entails and what it provides for a future in nursing.

To become a Registered Nurse (RN), one must first earn either an Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) or a Bachelor's of Science in Nursing (BSN) and pass the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX).

One can practice as an RN with either an associate's or a bachelor's degree. The difference in each degree lies mainly in the amount of education required. The incentive to receive a BSN versus an ADN lies in increased salary, job opportunities and promotion.

An ADN, sometimes referred to as an ASN, Associate of Science in Nursing, is typically a 2-year degree, while earning a BSN might take four years. Once a qualified individual completes their degree program and passes the NCLEX, he or she is considered an RN, regardless of ASN or BSN. Many ASN-RN's choose to continue their education to receive their BSN through an ASN to BSN (RN to BSN) program, which is typically 18 to 24 months.

Amanda Bucceri Androus RN, BSN

Amanda Bucceri Androus RN, BSN

Amanda Bucceri Androus is a Registered Nurse from Sacramento, California. She graduated from California State University, Sacramento in 2000 with a bachelor's degree in nursing. She began her career working night shifts on a pediatric/ med-surg unit for six years, later transferring to a telemetry unit where she worked for four more years. She currently works as a charge nurse in a busy outpatient primary care department. In her spare time she likes to read, travel, write, and spend time with her husband and two children.
Amanda Bucceri Androus RN, BSN

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