What Is an Infusion Nurse?

An infusion nurse is a registered nurse who specializes in the administration of medications and fluids through an intravenous (IV) line, central line, or venous access port. They can work as a resource to a hospital by starting lines and training new nurses in obtaining and maintaining IV access. An infusion nurse must be skilled in pharmacology, laboratory tests, and sometimes even telemetry to safely monitor patients throughout infusion therapy. They also have a steady hand, keen eye, and a lot of patience.

Becoming an Infusion Nurse

Starting peripheral intravenous lines is a skill best learned through experience. There are many techniques that result in successful IV starts, and many "tricks" nurses learn along the way. No two patients are the same, and neither are their veins. A nurse can build upon prior experience to obtain IV access on even the most challenging patients.

What Are the Educational Requirements for Infusion Nurses?

Those looking to become infusion nurses must first complete an accredited nursing program and obtain a nursing license. They can choose to earn an ADN or BSN nursing degree. BSN nurses have a broader range of opportunities, as they can pursue supervisory roles as well as become clinical nurse educators.

Obtaining clinical experience in intravenous access and diverse types of infusion therapy is a common requirement to become an infusion nurse. Many employers require a year or more of clinical experience. Areas that may help enhance intravenous access skills can include:

  • Pediatrics
  • Geriatrics
  • Oncology
  • Pre- and post-operative/ surgical units
  • Intensive care units

Are Any Certifications or Credentials Needed?

A practicing nurse can obtain formal infusion certification, although it is not required for some positions. The Certified Registered Nurse Infusion (CRNI) program is nationally recognized in credentialing nurses in infusion therapy. The requirements to obtain certification are:

  • An active RN license in the United States
  • A minimum of 1,600 hours of experience in infusion therapy within the last two years

Applicants who are approved to take the exam can schedule a date to test. There are 300 testing sites globally and the testing process takes about three hours.

Re-certification is required every three years. Nurses can either take an exam or complete 40 hours of continuing education credits to renew their certification.

Where Do Infusion Nurses Work?

Infusion nurses can work in the hospital setting in the following roles:

  • Bedside nurse
  • Resource nurse
  • Peripherally Inserted Central Line (PICC) nurse

They can also work in outpatient departments such as:

  • Infusion centers
  • Oncology
  • Home health
  • Primary care
  • Long-term care facilities
  • Skilled nursing homes

What Do Infusion Nurses do?

Infusion nurses are responsible for initiating and maintaining intravenous lines and tubing, administering medication and fluid therapy, and educating families on line maintenance and treatment.

What Are the Roles and Duties of an Infusion Nurse?

Infusion nurses can work in many different areas. In the hospital setting, an infusion nurse may:

  • Work as a resource starting intravenous lines
  • Inserting and maintaining PICC or midlines
  • Routine PICC/ midline dressing changes
  • Teaching intravenous access and PICC insertion

Outpatient or ambulatory care infusion nurses also have a wide array of job duties. These may include:

  • Intermittent chemotherapy infusion
  • Blood transfusions
  • Antibiotic infusions
  • Steroid infusions
  • Nutrition replacement/ vitamin infusions
  • Fluid/ electrolyte infusions

Both inpatient and outpatient infusion nurses share the following duties:

  • Patient/family education with regards to line site, tubing, and catheter management
  • Patient/family education on the rationale for therapy
  • Education on possible side effects/ adverse effects of therapy, and signs and symptoms of infection to report
  • Collaboration and communication with the ordering physician throughout therapy
  • Line maintenance and troubleshooting
  • Administering medications and fluid therapy
  • Reviewing pertinent lab values and drug information
  • Developing a plan of care with the patient, family, and physician with regards to infusion therapy
  • Monitor the patient's response to treatment throughout therapy
  • Assessing line site and patency regularly, keeping infection control and prevention as a priority

Infusion Nurse Salary & Employment

Infusion nurses can be in high demand. Many patients are being discharged from the hospital still needing to continue treatment. A medically stable patient would not need a lengthy hospital stay simply to receive infusions. Outpatient infusions have become more prevalent as hospitals work to reduce costs. According to The National Home Infusion Association website,home infusion is a safe and effective alternative to inpatient infusion treatment, and allows patients to resume normal activities more timely. This results in a higher demand for infusion nurses. According to salary.com, an infusion nurse earns a median salary of $83,171.This can vary, however, based on the state and organization in which the nurse is employed.

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